My Divine Intervention

I never really knew what a divine intervention was until February 28th 2017, more like I was to focused on my drinking to even care. That night I made the worst decision of my life, which now is the best thing that could have happened to me.

 


That night I chose to drive under the influence of alcohol. I was driving and hit a curb and then I hit a pole. No one was injured, thankfully. That next day I checked myself into rehab. After a decade of drinking this was my first attempt at going to an inpatient program. I had done outpatient and Detox programs with no success of my own doing.

Going to rehab changed my thinking. The 12 steps help me understand my character deficits and that it is up to me to make an effort to change my life. For so many years I’d place the blame on others, and never accepted ownership of my actions.

It was time for me to put down the magnifying glass and take out the mirror. To this day I still follow the 12-step principles. It made me realize I needed that divine intervention to get sober. It was my wake up call. I’m always trying to get a little better each day. If a hopeless drunk like me can get sober, so can you. We can recover! There is strength in numbers!

Strive to become the best version of yourself!

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Never Give Up!

Focus

“The world ain’t all sunshine and rainbows!” Even after being sober for over a year I have days where my motivation/drive is sub par. One of things I do when I feel down or unmotivated is watch motivational vidoes on YouTube. It gives me inspiration, and helps me get into a positive head space.

This is what works for me, but it may not work for you. Find your niche and find the new and improved you! There is strength in numbers, we can recover! Below is my goto motivational video. Check it out and start your day off with some positivity and inspiration!

What tips do you have to stay motivated?- Comment below

-Strive to become the best version of yourself!

Aprill 11 Daily Reflection

Daily Reflections

via Daily Reflections

Todays Daily Reflection hit home for me. It talks about blame. When I was in active addiction I would blame everyone and anyone, but never myself. I wasn’t the problem. Everyone else was the problem!

Recovery has taught me that I am the sole person to blame. Everything I do or say ends with me, no-one else. It took me along time to realize that I had to take ownership of my life. I know nothing changes overnight, but if you can string a few nights in a row change is possible and rewarding!

 

-Strive to become the best version of yourself!

Successful 90 Days

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If you are new to recovery you will probably hear a term called “90 and 90.” Which means you go to 90 meetings in 90 days. Some people ask why is this so important? I’ll explain why.

  1. It helps you get into a daily routine.
  2. You can try different meetings in different areas to find the right meeting for you.
  3. Networking- Going to meetings will help you meet new people in recovery.
  4. It increases your chances of finding a sponsor.
  5. You can get a commitment, which holds you accountable to make the meeting.
  6. Celebrate your milestones 30,60,90 days are big accomplishments, celebrate the wins.
  7. Going to meetings helps you understand your not alone, find people at meetings you can relate to.
  8. Time- You need to give your mind, body, and spirit time to readjust to your new life.
  9. It helped me deal with my social anxiety and other character defects.
  10. Talk to newcomers. Even if you’ve only been sober for 1 week you can help inspire the person with 1 day or less, pay it forward.

 

Some meetings are better then others. The 90 and 90 helps you find what is going to work for you. Keep an openmind, listen, and also share. Old timers will say “take the cotton ball out of your ears, and put it in your mouth.” I disagree a newcomber should listen, but also share there experience, strength, and hope.

Gratitude

Gratitude- is the quality of being thankful; readiness to show appreciation for and to return kindness.

When my journey to recovery began I was told to get into a routine. Every morning I would wake up make my bed, pray, and then write out a gratitude list. Everyday I write down 5 things I am grateful for. The next day I will write down five new things I am grateful for, trying not to repeat from the day before. This helped me realize and appreciate the little things in life. Such as having a place to rest my head at night or being able to eat everyday. These are things I took for granted even as an adult. After living with alcoholism I now know nothing should be taken for granted. Being grateful for the little things is what helped me build my recovery foundation.

They have apps you can use to type and save your gratitude list, or you can just go old school with pen and paper. I like being able to go back and reread my gratitude lists. This helps me recognize patterns, good or bad that I might need to address.

As I sit on an airplane headed to Vegas, for work, I have so much to be grateful for. I am grateful for my health, my loving family, having food to eat, a place to stay, and a job. I am also grateful for being an addict. The disease has torn me down, but I have been able to slowly rebuild my life. That is something I never thought I’d end up saying over a year later.

If you feel like giving up, do it tomorrow, because today we can do great things, if we put our minds to it!

Notice how the last part of the definition for gratitude talks about kindness? I will speak on that in my next post.

-Strive to become the best version of yourself!

Step Two

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“Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to Sanity.”

Sanity- The ability to think and behave in a normal and rational manner ;sound mental health, reasonable and rational behavior.

Just like in step one the second step came with a packet of questions to answer. I grew up Catholic, but I haven’t been to church in years. When I would pray, before I got into recovery, I would say these foxhole prayers. Which I have learned now is NOT the way to pray.  I don’t subscribe to any particular religion, but I do believe in a higher power, who I choose to call GOD. Step two for me was about reconnecting with my high power. The way I was able to reconnect with my higher power was through prayer, meditation, and nature. When I pray every morning I say thank you to God and I pray over my family and friends. I also ask that I live under Gods will, not my will.

What if you do not believe in a Higher Power? They say anything can be your higher power. Have you ever heard of the door knob as your Higher Power? If that works for you run with it! Find what you believe in. Nature, astrology, meditation, prayer, science, you can research all these topics which may help you find your Higher Power. If you are struggling with the HP concept read Chapter 4 of the Big Book, We Agnostics.

This is a quote from chapter 4 of the Big Book.

“At first some of us tried to avoid the issue, hoping against hope we were not true alcoholics. But after a while we had to face the fact that we must find a spiritual basis of life-or else. Perhaps it is going to be that way with you. But cheer up, something like half of us thought we were atheists or agnostic. Our experience shows that you need not be disconcerted.”

There is hope for anyone to find a Higher Power, you have to be willing,  honest, and open-minded. You have to be willing to seek change, be honest with yourself, others, and your Higher Power. Also, keep an open mind!

Below are the  questions I had to answer from my step two packet. I hope these questions will help people better understand step 2 and increase their conscious contact with a Higher Power.

How can I see a Higher power working in my life?

What characteristics does my Higher Power NOT have?

What characteristics does my Higher Power have?

Whats the point of step 2?

Can I believe that other alcoholics/addicts have found peace of mind through this process?

What is it precisely and in detail that I have worshiped?

What exactly have I experiences?

Am I willing to consider that I am not at the core of everything and hence there may be a power greater than any one of us?

Was I insane or crazy to believe the lies the alcohol/drugs told me?

In what areas of my life do I need sanity?

How does my childhood understanding of God affect my life and recovery today?

What are my grievances against a Higher Power?

What is the evidence that a Higher Power is working in my life?

How can I incorporate a Higher Power of some form into my recovery?

I hope this helped. Have a blessed Day!